Italian
We had the occasion of traveling many kilometers along the Alpe Adria Radweg cycleway during our trip by bike among Trentino, Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia and in more recent days, but the few tourist attractions we visited made us really want to find out more. The Alpe Adria radweg is a cycling-tourist route connecting Salzburg, in Austria, to Grado on the Adriatic Sea, and is perfect for those wanting to get to know these territories, from art cities to the medieval villages, from the mountains to the sea, in a slow way, with no stress.  Cycling itinerary of the Alpe Adria Radweg
Living in Trento and having a racing bike, it happened to me many times, especially at the beginning of the season, to train along the Adige cycle path which runs along the bottom of the valley and often, in summer, it happened to me to meet many cycling tourists, first of all German: the route is indeed ideal for those wanting to skip the traffic and is well linked to other routes that combined can make a trip by bike rather varied and interesting.
The Adige cycle path is the longest cycle path in the whole province and continues in the nearby provinces of Verona and Bolzano, being a perfect route for those who love the tranquility of pedaling with no effort and with good cultural-touristic alternatives along the way.
Lake Iseo, also known as Sebino, is one of the Lombardy basins. Divided between the province of Bergamo and that of Brescia, it is still unknown to mass tourism and this is also the reason why is excellently appropriate for practicing cycle-tourism. The tour of Lake Iseo can start by any villages on its banks, but for convenience we will start it from Riva di Solto, on the Bergamo bank, where you can park your car and enjoy an ice-cream on your way back to celebrate the venture.
The tour of Lake Iseo runs through the whole circumnavigation of the Lombardy lake in 66 km of cycle paths and mixed secondary roads that during sunny weekends and high tourist season can be averagely busy.
The Parenzana rail was an old narrow gauge railway that connected the city of Trieste to Buje and Poreč, Parenzo in Italian (whence the name Parenzana!). Built by the Austrian-Hungarians in 1902, it was the longest narrow gauge railway on the 760 mm. Ruins of the railway are still visible today and one of the most interesting tourist activity in the area is walking through the track (entirely or partially) by bike!

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