Italian
We had the occasion of traveling many kilometers along the Alpe Adria Radweg cycleway during our trip by bike among Trentino, Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia and in more recent days, but the few tourist attractions we visited made us really want to find out more. The Alpe Adria radweg is a cycling-tourist route connecting Salzburg, in Austria, to Grado on the Adriatic Sea, and is perfect for those wanting to get to know these territories, from art cities to the medieval villages, from the mountains to the sea, in a slow way, with no stress.  Cycling itinerary of the Alpe Adria Radweg
Living in Trento and having a racing bike, it happened to me many times, especially at the beginning of the season, to train along the Adige cycle path which runs along the bottom of the valley and often, in summer, it happened to me to meet many cycling tourists, first of all German: the route is indeed ideal for those wanting to skip the traffic and is well linked to other routes that combined can make a trip by bike rather varied and interesting.
The Adige cycle path is the longest cycle path in the whole province and continues in the nearby provinces of Verona and Bolzano, being a perfect route for those who love the tranquility of pedaling with no effort and with good cultural-touristic alternatives along the way.
The railway of the Dolomites, later become cycle path of the Dolomites, was opened in 1921 to connect Calalzo di Cadore, Dobbiaco and Cortina d'Ampezzo. With the passing years and the development of motorization and technologies it was gradually abandoned. 
It had its time of glory during the year 1956 on occasion of the Cortina Winter Olympics, but then its decline was inevitable especially when, in 1960, there was a serious accident in which two persons died. 65 kilometers long, the railway was dismantled in 1964. Today, as mentioned before, the railway has become the cycle path of the Dolomites and connects Calalzo di Cadore in the Veneto region to Dobbiaco in the Alto Adige region.
We’re in Umbria where you can’t see the sea but where hills, protected areas, beautiful villages perched on promontories... surely don’t lack! It is the year 1926 and it’s an autumn full of news for this area in central Italy: the Spoleto – Norcia railway line, with narrow-gauge and electric traction, is ready to start its short story in the overview of the Italian railways now almost forgotten!
The route of the Valsugana Cycle Path stretches for about 80 km between the Trentino and Veneto region; from Pergine Valsugana, a few bike rides from Lake Caldonazzo, you get to Bassano del Grappa, in the province of Vicenza, after covering all the valley. This cycle path stretches almost entirely in the plains and right for this reason is a cycle-tourism route also suitable for families with children, in addition the Valsugana valley is entirely crossed by the railway line and regional trains can be a comfy alternative to cycling in case of tiredness or to go back to the starting point.
The evolution of transports, the revolution of rubber and the resulting abandon of the railway lines, over the years has led to a transformation: some abandoned railways have been rehabilitated becoming paths for pedestrians and cyclists. Also in Italy this small change has had important results in the development and diffusion of cycling tourism: where there is a secure path for bicycles the curious and the travelers arrive and induced tourism grows... 
I had never done a bicycle trip before this one, but I have always been fascinated by those brave bikers I occasionally meet on the road, with their huge bags on both sides of the bicycle, their worn clothes and a little flag indicating their native country. For me they are the most significant image of freedom. I have always admired and respected them. So I had a dream in mind for many years, a solo bicycle tour. The itinerary choice has not been difficult: the classical Way of st. James by bicycle was everything I was looking for, and even more.
1600 kilometers travelling by bike from the Anglo-Saxon territories to the capital city of Italy, the Via Francigena is the itinerary that the Archbishop Sigeric traveled in 990 to reach Rome after leaving from Canterbury 79 days before. Sigeric described in detail his long pilgrimage in his own diary and thanks to his precious testimony nowadays it is still possible to follow, at least in part, the ancient Via Francigena by bicycle, together with the thousands of pilgrimscycling travelers and wayfarers every year.
The Parenzana rail was an old narrow gauge railway that connected the city of Trieste to Buje and Poreč, Parenzo in Italian (whence the name Parenzana!). Built by the Austrian-Hungarians in 1902, it was the longest narrow gauge railway on the 760 mm. Ruins of the railway are still visible today and one of the most interesting tourist activity in the area is walking through the track (entirely or partially) by bike!

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